Pictures from Chatham's Past: 1910's

Edited by Henry H. Mitchell

Confederate veterans, 1910

Confederate veterans of Pittsylvania County are being honored by the Rawley Martin Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy, at a dinner in 1910 in Chatham. (See further details.)



Bob White Patrol, 1910

This photograph is from the Preston B. Moses Collection. It was found in an undated clipping from the Star-Tribune, Chatham, Virginia, ca. 1950. The caption as written by Preston Moses is: “Among the first troops of the Boy Scouts of America was organized at Chatham — in 1910, the first year of Boy Scouts in the United States. [Here] is shown the ‘Bob White Patrol,’ troop Number 1 which was composed of Chatham boys, who lived here in 1910. … The picture, loaned to us by Mrs. Kate Powell, shows, left to right, seated — J. W. Marks, scout master, and Max T. Shelhorse; Standing — Thomas Mitchell, Thomas Shelhorse, Mumford Reid, George Townes Rison, Berke Bennett and Maury Reid. Max Shelhorse is now in Richmond with the administrative association of the Virginia State Department of Health. Mr. Marks owned a clothing store here but is now deceased. Mitchell was the son of the operator of Chatham Hotel and now lives in Jellico, Tenn. Thomas Shelorse now lives in Richmond. Mumford Reid now resides in Detroit, associated with Vicar, Inc. Rison lives in the county near Sandy Level. Bennett now lives in Gainesville, Fla. Maury Reid is deceased.”



Chatham Training School, around 1910

This postcard shows a view from the southeast corner of Ingleside (24 Hargrave Boulevard, the Martin-Tucker House) around 1910, during its use as Chatham Training School (which later became Hargrave Military Academy).



Lower Main Street, 1911

This photograph is from the Preston B. Moses Collection. It was printed in the Star-Tribune, Chatham, Virginia, Thursday, October 6, 1977, p. 1B. The caption as written by Preston Moses is: “Not a car is in sight on Chatham's main street February 2[8?], 1911. Whitehead & Yeatts was the biggest store here then. It burned a few years later. The Tribune office is seen adjoining the Whitehead & Yeatts building.”



Countyseat Giants 1912

Chatham's baseball team, the Countyseat Giants, in 1912 (see further details). The photograph is from the Preston B. Moses Collection, from an undated clipping from the Star-Tribune, Chatham, Virginia.



B. S. White and Son

B. S. White & Son combined a shoe shop with a harness and saddle business around 1912, as shown in an undated clipping from the Star-Tribune, Chatham, Virginia. (See further details.)



Old Chatham Depot

Chatham railroad station in 1912, before the main line was moved up the hill to its present location, and the “new” depot built. These tracks are currently used as an industrial siding. The road crossing the tracks on this side of the station is present-day VA 57 (Depot Street). (The photograph is from the Preston B. Moses Collection, and was printed in the Star-Tribune, Chatham, Virginia, October 6, 1977, p. 4C. The caption on that date includes the statement, “Old 97 passed along here on this track on that fateful day in 1903.”)



E. L. Ingram at the Sims House

E. L. Ingram, Raleigh Goods salesman, is seen with his mule and wagon at the Sims House at 242 Whittle Street in 1918. (See further details.) The photograph is from the collection of the late Lucy Ingram Campbell.



Molly Ingram and Mrs. Stevens

Molly (Mrs. E. L.) Ingram, at right, with her mother Mrs. Stevens at the end of Whittle Street, in a photograph probably taken on the same day in 1918 as the one immediately above. The newly-constructed Guyer home is immediately behind them. (See further details.) The photograph is from the collection of the late Lucy Ingram Campbell.



Bennett Hotel, 1918

This photograph of the building at the southwest corner of Main Street and Court Place is from the Preston B. Moses Collection. It was printed in the Star-Tribune, Chatham, Virginia, Thursday, October 6, 1977, p. 3B. The caption as written by Preston Moses is: “This is Bennett Hotel (later Hotel Chatham), owned by G. R. Bennett, when it was a two-story building in 1918. J. W. Marks & Co., famous clothing store, occupied the ground floor. Note the vacant lot at left, trees on the side street, electric lights hung on wire across street. The sign on phone post warns motorists to ‘close muffler, penalty $2.50 to $5.00 for violations.’ Main Street had been paved down the middle with asphalt, while the cobblestone roadway still showed on each side. At Bennett's death in 1918, the hotel was sold to O. S. B. Yeatts and his brother Willie Yeatts. When business was booming here in the 1920's, the Yeatts brothers added the third floor. Other owners of the hotel include Hunt Whitehead, who purchased it from the Yeatts estate in 1958. After Whitehead's death, Dr. Ernest Overbey was the owner for a short time before he sold out to Dick Woodfin. Woodfin had it [mostly] torn down in 1974.”

(See also information about earlier hotel presence on this corner.)



Automobile at Pruden Hall

An open car is shown in front of Pruden Hall, Chatham Episcopal Institute. The image is from a (probably pre-1920) postcard which was incorrectly captioned “Dabney Hall, C. E. I.”



Three Cars near Bennett Hotel

Three cars are shown in front of J. W. Marks & Co., which occupies the ground floor of the Bennett Hotel. The photograph is from the Glenn B. Updike, Sr., Collection of the Pittsylvania Historical Society. The original image has the date “1916” handwritten on its face.



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